God’s Eyes (2/10/17)

Y3 had fun making ‘god’s eyes this week.  We have been learning in RE about how different religions think about God.  We learned about a primitive form of star weaving, reminiscent of a dreamcatcher, Ojo de Dios, or God’s Eyes are still woven today by the Huichol Indians of Mexico. The idea is to use bright colors to serve as an eye to watch over others (especially babies) and to bring good luck.

The Ojo de Dios or God’s eye is a ritual tool, magical object, and cultural symbol evoking the weaving motif and its spiritual associations for the Huichol and Tepehuan Indians of western Mexico. The God’s Eye is symbolic of the power of seeing and understanding that which is unknown and unknowable, The Mystery.

The four points represent the elemental processes: earth, fire, air, and water.

The Huichol call their God’s eyes Sikuli, which means “the power to see and understand things unknown.” When a child is born, the central eye is woven by the father, then one eye is added for every year of the child’s life until the child reaches the age of five.